Tesla will reportedly move stores out of high-end malls use remote fleets

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The days of seeing Tesla stores in fancy malls retail centers may be over, according to a report from Electrek. Sources tell the site that Tesla will instead focus on finding cheaper spaces, like parking lots warehouses, that will house a remote fleet of cars. The company also won’t be firing its retail staff (it’s actually in the middle of a hiring spree). Instead of being tied to individual stores, those workers will help to manage Tesla testing purchases from those remote locations.

If this news sounds familiar, it’s because Tesla previously said it was going to close most of its stores in 2019 before quickly reversing course. This new strategy, if it ends up being implemented, seems to be a smarter implementation of that plan. Most Tesla customers already buy their cars online, so there’s less of a need to have pricey mall stores around. The cheaper locations will also be better for holding more vehicles, which should help to satisfy increased demfor purchases test drives. 

 

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Uber is moving into flower deliveries

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The next time you open Uber Eats, you might see a new delivery option: a way to have flowers dropped off at your door swiftly with just a few taps. has teamed up with flower industry stalwart FTD for its first nationwide florist partnership as part of its latest on-demdelivery venture.

Folks in New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas, Miami some other locations can now order flower arrangements from FTD’s ProFlowers locations. Uber expects to roll out the option nationwide by early 2022, so it should be available almost everywhere by Mother’s Day next May. You can see the available options by tapping the flower icons in the Uber Eats app selecting a ProFlowers location. Uber Pass Eats Pass subscribers will get discounts no-free deliveries on eligible orders of at least $15.

Deliveries have become an increasingly important part of Uber’s business over the last couple of years. One key reason is that far fewer people took rides amid COVID-19 restrictions. The company recently markets to more than 400 US towns cities, it just started in Texas.

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‘Disinfo kills’: protesters demFacebook act to stop vaccine falsehoods | Facebook

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Activists descended on Facebook’s Washington headquarters on Wednesday to demthe company take stronger action against vaccine falsehoods spreading on its platform, covering the area in front of Facebook’s office with body bags that read “disinfo kills”.

The day of protest, which comes as Covid cases surge in the US, has been organized by a group of scholars, advocates activists calling themselves the “Real” Oversight Board. The group is urging Facebook’s shareholders to ban so-called misinformation “superspreaders” – the small number of accounts responsible for the majority of false misleading content about the Covid-19 vaccines.

“People are making decisions based on the disinformation that’s being spread on Facebook,” said Shireen Mitchell, Member of the Real Facebook Oversight Board founder of Stop Online Violence Against Women. “If Facebook is not going to take that down, or if all they’re going to do is put out disclaimers, then fundamentally Facebook is participating in these deaths as well.”

In coordination with the protest, the Real Oversight Board has released a new report analyzing the spread of anti-vaccine misinformation on Facebook during the company’s most recent financial quarter. The report protest also come as Facebook announced its financial earnings for that same quarter, logging its fastest growth since 2016.

The report references a March study from the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) that found a small group of accounts – known as the “dirty dozen” – is responsible for more than 73% of anti-vaccine content across social media platforms, including Facebook. That report recently drew attention from the White House, Joe Biden has condemned Facebook other tech companies for failing to take action.

Facebook banned misinformation about vaccines from the platform in February of 2021, but critics say many posts slip through the platform’s filters reach audiences of millions without being removed.

At Facebook’s Washington DC headquarters, activists lay body bags that read “disinfo kills”. Photograph: Eric Kayne/AP

It also has introduced a number of rules relating to Covid-19 specifically, banning posts that question the severity of the disease, deny its existence, or argue that the vaccine has more risks than the virus. Still, the Real Oversight Board found that often such content has been able to remain on the platform even make its way into the most-shared posts.

According to the Real Oversight Board’s report, a large share of the misinformation about the Covid vaccines comes from a few prolific accounts, continues to be among the platform’s best performing most widely shared content. It analyzed the top 10 posts on each weekday over the last quarter found the majority of those originated from just five identified “superspreaders” of misinformation.

“When it comes to Covid disinformation, the vast majority of content comes from an extremely small group of highly visible users, making it far easier to combat it than Facebook admits,” the board said, concluding that Facebook is “continuing to profit from hate deadly disinformation”.

The group has called on Facebook to remove the users from the platform or alter its algorithm to disable engagement with the offending accounts. A Facebook spokesman said the company disagrees with the statistic that 65% of vaccine misinformation comes from just 12 people.

“We permanently ban pages, groups, accounts that repeatedly break our rules on Covid misinformation, this includes more than a dozen pages, groups, accounts from these individuals,” he said.

The spokesman added that Facebook has removed more than 18m pieces of Covid misinformation flagged more than 167m pieces of information, connecting users to its Covid-19 information center.

“We remain the only company to partner with more than 80 fact-checking organizations covering over 60 languages, using AI to scale those factchecks against duplicate posts across our platform,” he said.

Congress has also taken note of the spread of vaccine misinformation on Facebook other platforms, with the Democratic senator Amy Klobuchar introducing a bill that would target platforms whose algorithms promotes health misinformation related to an “existing public health emergency”.

The bill, called the Health Misinformation Act, would remove protections provided by the internet law Section 230, which prevent platforms from being sued over content posted by their users in such cases.

“For far too long, online platforms have not done enough to protect the health of Americans,” Klobuchar said in a statement on the bill. “These are some of the biggest, richest companies in the world, they must do more to prevent the spread of deadly vaccine misinformation.”

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Krispy Kreme has created official Xbox-branded doughnuts

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Gaming promos are getting zanier all the time. The days of grabbing a Mountain Dew or a pack of Doritos for a chance to win an Xbox One are long gone. In our attention-zapped world, it has to be new or else it’s DOA. With that in mind, Krispy Kreme has come up with the “Nexus Level” doughnut as part of a new Xbox cross promotion in the UK Ireland. That’s it above in all its icing-covered glory.

Buy a box of the Xbox-branded doughnuts between August 2nd 22nd for a chance of winning an Xbox Series S a month of Xbox Game Pass Ultimate (if you’re a new subscriber). To check if you’ve snagged the console, you need to scan the QR code on the box enter your unique code. 

It’s not as madcap as the Destiny toaster or KFC’s bucket-shaped gaming PC, or even the Xbox Mini Fridge. But, you can’t actually eat any of those. Krispy Kreme is clearly in on the joke. An accompanying video features actors as the team behind the doughnut, with corporate titles like “product innovator” “quality assurance guru,” touting its “revolutionary design” “ergonomic form.” 

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The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles review – an open shut case of gaming brilliance | Games

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I’ll be the first to admit my bias when it comes to the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney games – the legal-themed mystery series that partly inspired me to become a qualified (though not practising) lawyer – so the fact that I like The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles is no surprise. The real twist is that what might have been a mere spin-off tale about Phoenix Wright’s ancestor in Victorian London has turned out to be perhaps my favourite game in the series, thanks to series creator Shu Takumi’s return to the writer-director’s seat.

Despite the different setting, the basics of video-game lawyering remain largely unchanged: investigate, gather evidence, scrutinise testimony present your undeniable proof that witnesses are mistaken, ignorant, or straight up lying. Though there are some additions that make for even livelier trials, including group testimonies with clashing witnesses, or the need to appeal to a surly arbitrary jury, the core thrill – of presenting that key piece of evidence that reduces a smug, preening culprit to a snivelling mess – remains.

It’s in the presentation that Chronicles most clearly surpasses its predecessors. Ace Attorney has always had brilliant, fastidiously timed animations but this time the advantages of a 3D engine are far better utilised. The act of pointing an accusatory finger to emphasise your well-placed objection is made even more dramatic with a chamber orchestra going absolutely berserk as the camera smoothly swings around with a flourish. And cinematic tricks such as slow pans or sudden zooms are deployed artfully to heighten the tension or for a sudden shock. Characters will swap outfits or brandish weapons (or small dogs) for a gag, or as a vital clue. It’s definitely a major step up from the previous iterations.

International intrigue … The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles. Photograph: Capcom

Chronicles is, effectively, a single story split across two games, while that does make the experience almost twice as long as usual (somewhere in the 40-hour range or more) it also helps it break from the series’ usual formula. Once the familiar rhythms of the standard Ace Attorney five-chapter story are cast off, other traditions also begin to seem much less stable, allowing the game to defy assumptions continually surprise the player. But even with its considerably longer runtime, Chronicles feels like it has less legal filler than prior games, with even seemingly unrelated cases tying in well with the game’s main storyline of international intrigue.

There is the usual cast of eccentric entertaining witnesses, defendants other assorted malcontents. And various characters concepts from Sherlockian fiction – reinterpreted in ways surprising amusing – also make their appearance. Indeed, the Great Detective himself (albeit renamed Herlock Sholmes) is a constant companion, helping hindering in roughly equal measure. Putting Sholmes straight in the Dance of Deduction minigame, where you correct his brilliant-yet-flawed conclusions, is a wonderfully choreographed spin on the classic “parlour room” deduction sequence that never fails to entertain.

Considering that the writing has to serve at least three different purposes – presenting a series of convoluted but solvable mysteries, realising the series’ trademark wit, humour emotional power, placing it all squarely in a faux-Victorian era – writer Takumi Capcom’s translation team have done a truly sublime job. In fact, the writing is perhaps a little too overzealous at times on that last bit; playing as a Japanese national in 1900s London, the sheer amount of xenophobia you have to deal with can prove exhausting, even if it’s not nearly as dispiriting as a truly accurate rendition might be.

On a separate but equally irritating note, there are occasions when you, the player, will have already realised what is wrong with a given situation but have no idea which specific piece of evidence you need to present in order to force the game to realise it. Thankfully, compared to earlier games in the series, there’s a lot less of that in Chronicles, which mostly guides you smoothly from deduction to deduction, making you feel like a genius in the process.

All of it comes together in a finale that ties everything neatly together and, even compared to its predecessors, simply astounds in the sheer audacity of who what exactly you are facing. If asked, therefore, whether The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles (as a complete package) is the best game in the franchise, I can really offer no objections. I rest my case.



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