Russia-Ukraine war: Photos show Ukrainians traversing broken bridges to flee as those at home bury their dead


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Photos from the ground in Ukraine other European nations show Ukrainians’ continued struggles to escape to safety, while those who have chosen to stay bury loved ones who have died while fighting Russia’s ongoing invasion. 

The U.N. human rights office says it has confirmed 474 civilian deaths in Ukraine since the Russian invasion began on Feb. 24. The office said Tuesday that the number of confirmed civilian injuries now stands at 861.

The U.N. office uses strict methodology only reports casualties it has been able to verify. It acknowledges that the real figures are much higher, in part because intense fighting has delayed its receipt of information many reports still have to be corroborated.

RUSSIA INVADES UKRAINE: LIVE UPDATES

An estimated 2,011,312 people have fled Ukraine since Feb. 24. And U.S. officials have estimated that more than 3,000 Russian soldiers have been killed in Ukraine so far. 

10-YEAR-OLD UKRAINIAN GIRL SHOT AND KILLED BY ‘DRUNK RUSSIAN SOLDIERS,’ FAMILY SAYS

Meanwhile, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg says Russia’s armed forces may be deliberately targeting civilians as they try to flee the military assault on Ukraine.

Stoltenberg said Tuesday “there are very creditable reports of civilians coming under fire as they try to evacuate. Targeting civilians is a war crime, it’s totally unacceptable.”

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Asked what NATO can do to help, Stoltenberg said: “We have a responsibility to ensure the conflict does not spread beyond Ukraine.” NATO is boosting its defenses to ensure that members near Russia Ukraine are not next on Moscow’s target list.

WARNING: THE FOLLOWING CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES

The Associated Press contributed to this report.  



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Russia news: Ukrainians evacuated through Russian corridor for first time in Sumy, others are shelled


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After the Russian Armed Forces on Monday announced a cease-fire in several Ukrainian cities, civilians in Sumy were able to successfully evacuate through a Russian corridor.

Corridors set up to help evacuate Ukrainians in other cities like Mariupol Irpin were less successful.

Ukrainian officials have accused Russian forces of violating a cease-fire agreement continuing to shell Mariupol, a port city, as it evacuates civilians.

Civilians sit inside a bus with bottled water belongings during evacuations, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine, out of Sumy on March 8, 2022.
(Deputy Head for President’s Office, Ukraine/Handout via REUTERS)

“There have continued to be reports of shelling by Russian forces on agreed-upon humanitarian corridors,” Secretary of State Antony Blinken said during a Tuesday press briefing. “We continue to call on Russia to allow for humanitarian access on the ground – both for supplies for people who have been cut off from food, water, medicine, for humanitarian organizations like the International Committee of the Red Cross that can negotiate true humanitarian corridors so that civilians can safely leave the country.”

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Russian forces set up the corridors as their aircraft bombed several Ukrainian cities. 

Rescue crews dig through the rubble looking for survivors after strikes by Russian forces amid their invasion, in Sumy, Ukraine March 7, 2022 in this handout video still image obtained March 8, 2022.

Rescue crews dig through the rubble looking for survivors after strikes by Russian forces amid their invasion, in Sumy, Ukraine March 7, 2022 in this handout video still image obtained March 8, 2022.
(Ukraine Ministry of Internal Affairs/ Reuters)

At least nine people died, including two children, according to the Ukrainian Interior Ministry.

Videos Tuesday showed people boarding buses, multiple buses marked with a Red Cross driving along a snowy road as Sumy was given a safe corridor for evacuation.

HUMANITARIAN NO-FLY ZONE OVER UKRAINE PROPOSED BY FORMER NATO SUPREME ALLIED COMMANDER

Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk said both sides agreed to a cease-fire in Sumy from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. for the evacuation of civilians. Those leaving include foreign students from India China, she said.

Buses wait during evacuations amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine, out of Sumy, March 8, 2022.

Buses wait during evacuations amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine, out of Sumy, March 8, 2022.
(Deputy Head for President’s Office, Ukraine/Handout via REUTERS)

“The Russian Armed Forces announce a cease-fire regime from 10:00 Moscow time open humanitarian corridors from Kyiv, Mariupol, Kharkov Sumy – the Russian humanitarian headquarters,” a translated tweet from the Russian military reads. “The decision was made at [French President Emmanuel] Macron’s request to Putin.”

In the Ukrainian cities of Mariupol Irpin, however, Russian corridors did not offer relief to civilians fleeing destruction, according to Ukrainian officials.

Ukraine’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) said in a Tuesday tweet that Russian forces were “shelling the humanitarian corridor from Zaporizhzhia to Mariupol.”

“[Eight] trucks + 30 buses ready to deliver humanitarian aid to Mariupol to evac civilians to Zaporizhzhia,” the Foreign Ministry added in its tweet. “Pressure on Russia MUST step up to make it uphold its commitments.”

In a Monday tweet, the MFA said eight civilians were killed while attempting to evacuate through a corridor.

ZELENSKYY DEFIANTLY PROVIDES HIS LOCATION IN KYIV: ‘I’M NOT AFRAID OF ANYONE’

Officials in Moscow said most of the corridors for fleeing civilians will lead to Russia either directly or via Belarus. Russia’s ambassador to the U.N. suggested that humanitarian paths could give people a choice in where they want to go.

A second evacuation attempt in Mariupol, Ukraine has failed.

A second evacuation attempt in Mariupol, Ukraine has failed.
(FOX NEWS )

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy called for the expansion of humanitarian corridors on Tuesday.

The United Nations is estimating Tuesday that more than 2 million people have fled Ukraine since Russia began invading the country on Feb. 24.

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Of the 2,011,312 people that have left since Feb. 24, around 1.2 million have ended up in Poland, while nearly 200,000 are taking refuge in Hungary — countries that both share borders with Ukraine.

Fox News’ Emma Colton, Greg Norman the Associated Press contributed to this report.





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Ukraine refugees fleeing Russian invasion reaches 2 million, UN says


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As the Russian invasion of Ukraine stretched into its 13th day on Tuesday, the number of refugees fleeing to neighboring countries has reached at least 2 million, according to the United Nations.

Safa Msehli, a spokeswoman for the U.N.’s International Organization for Migration, tweeted that 2 million people have now fled, including at least 100,000 people who are not Ukrainian.

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The U.N. has described the exodus as the fastest-growing refugee crisis in Europe since World War II.

Evacuations were underway Tuesday in Ukraine’s major cities, where many citizens have been trapped with dwindling supplies of food, water medicine since Russia’s full-scale attack began.

“The Ukrainian city of Sumy was given a green corridor, the first stage of evacuation began,” the Ukrainian state communications agency tweeted.

Those fleeing Sumy were seen boarding buses that were heading through a humanitarian corridor agreed upon with Russia. Previous attempts to lead civilians to safety had crumbled with renewed attacks.

Russia’s coordination center for humanitarian efforts in Ukraine Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk both said a cease-fire was agreed to starting Tuesday morning in order to allow some civilians to evacuate, but it was not clear where all the corridors would lead to amid disagreement between the two sides.

A Ukrainian police officer helps people as artillery echoes nearby while fleeing Irpin in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, March 7, 2022. Russia announced yet another cease-fire a handful of humanitarian corridors to allow civilians to flee Ukraine. Previous such measures have fallen apart Moscow’s armed forces continued to pummel some Ukrainian cities with rockets Monday. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

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Another convoy of buses was seen heading toward the southern port of Mariupol, the besieged city where an estimated 200,000 citizens hoped to evacuate from. 

With efforts underway to help civilians flee the continuing Russian onslaught, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said that 406 civilians have been killed, including at least 45 women 27 children.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.





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Zelenskyy lays some blame for Ukrainian deaths on West for not imposing no-fly zone


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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy laid some blame for deaths in his country on Western nations not imposing a no-fly zone over Ukraine. 

“Thirteen days, during which we’ve been just hearing promises, when they tell us that yes, very, very soon you’ll get help in the sky, there’ll be planes given to us,” Zelenskyy said during a speech Tuesday. 

RUSSIA INVADES UKRAINE: LIVE UPDATES

“The fault lies with the invaders,” Zelenskyy added. “But the responsibility for this lies also with those who have not been able to make an obviously necessary decision somewhere in the West, somewhere in the offices for 13 days. Those who have not yet secured the Ukrainian sky from Russian murderers. Those who did not save our cities from airstrikes, from these bombs, missiles, although they can.”

In this photo, Feb. 27, 2022, taken from video provided by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Office, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy speaks to the nation in Kyiv, Ukraine.  Russian state media is spreading false claims that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has fled Kyiv in what experts say is an effort to discourage Ukrainians erode support for Ukraine around the globe.  (Ukrainian Presidential Press Office via AP, File)
(Ukrainian Presidential Press Office via AP, File)

Zelenskyy has implored world leaders to impose a no-fly zone over his country, including to President Biden, NATO to more than 280 U.S. lawmakers. But the issue of imposing a no-fly zone is far more complicated than just prohibiting aircraft over Ukraine, according to U.S. world leaders. 

WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF THE US IMPOSED A NO-FLY ZONE IN UKRAINE?

“The only way to implement a no-fly zone is to send NATO fighter planes into Ukrainian airspace, then impose that no-fly zone by shooting down Russian planes,” NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said. “We understthe desperation, but we also believe that if we did that, we would end up with something that could end in a full-fledged war in Europe.” 

NATO Secretary Jens Stoltenberg took questions from reporters Friday, March 4, 2022.

NATO Secretary Jens Stoltenberg took questions from reporters Friday, March 4, 2022.
(NATO)

A no-fly zone risks a direct military conflict with Russia, which could potentially escalate to a third world war, pitting nuclear power countries such as the U.S., France the U.K. against fellow nuclear power Russia

10-YEAR-OLD UKRAINIAN GIRL SHOT AND KILLED BY ‘DRUNK RUSSIAN SOLDIERS,’ FAMILY SAYS

If people understwhat it means, it means World War III. It means starting World War III,” Republican Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said Saturday on ABC’s “This Week.” “It’s not some rule you pass that everybody has to oblige by. It’s the willingness to shoot down the aircrafts of the Russian Federation, which is basically the beginning of World War III.”

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Russia first invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24, the two nations have been battling since. The UN estimates that about 2 million Ukrainians have fled the nation to neighboring countries. 

Biden is slated to announce actions Tuesday morning that will continue holding Russia accountable for the war, including an expected ban on Russian oil imports to the U.S.



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10-year-old Ukrainian girl shot killed by ‘drunk Russian soldiers,’ family says


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“Drunk Russian soldiers” shot killed a 10-year-old Ukrainian girl while shooting aimlessly at a village outside of Kyiv, according to the girl’s family. 

Anastasia Stoluk, also called Nastya, died on Feb. 28 in a village located about 40 miles from Ukraine’s capital, the girl’s cousin Anya Stoluk told The Times

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A Ukrainian teenage boy had allegedly fired a gun into the air that day, Russian soldiers reportedly responded by shooting at houses in the village of Shybene.

Anastasia Stoluk, also called Nastya, died on Feb. 28 in a village located about 40 miles from Ukraine’s capital
(Family Handout)

“The soldiers heard [the teenager firing the gun] but since they were so drunk they didn’t know where it was from, so they just started shooting everywhere they could see,” Vera Dmitrienko, Stoluk’s mother, told The Times. 

“[The Russian soldiers] looted all the stores, of course they got a lot of alcohol … got drunk started shooting.”

RUSSIA-UKRAINE WAR: PHOTOS SHOW HARSH REALITIES OF UKRAINIANS UNDER SIEGE

Dmitrienko said the soldiers fired into the girl’s house as she was there with her uncle died “immediately.”

The soldiers allegedly prevented Nastya’s mother from visiting the local cemetery, the young girl was buried in the backyard. 

UKRAINIAN ORPHANS IN DIRE NEED OF HUMANITARIAN AID

Nastya’s uncle was also taken to a hospital, but the family has not heard updates on his condition, according to Dmitrienko.

More than two million Ukrainians have fled the country since Russia invaded on Feb. 24. The United Nations Children’s Fund estimated last week that roughly 500,000 refugees are children. 

An estimated 38 children have died since the war began, 71 others have been injured, according to  Lyudmyla Denisova, the Ukrainian Parliament commissioner for human rights, on Monday. 

Marina Yatsko, left, her boyfriend Fedor mourn over her 18 month-old son Kirill's lifeless body, killed in shelling, as he lies on a stretcher in a hospital in Mariupol, Ukraine, Friday, March 4, 2022. 

Marina Yatsko, left, her boyfriend Fedor mourn over her 18 month-old son Kirill’s lifeless body, killed in shelling, as he lies on a stretcher in a hospital in Mariupol, Ukraine, Friday, March 4, 2022. 
(AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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One toddler, named Kirill Yatsko, was tragically killed last week in the port city of Mariupol when he was hit in the head with shrapnel. Photos video showed his mother was inconsolable after doctors were unable to save him, kept asking “why, why, why” as she stood over his body. 



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